ComicCon-ing: Learning How to Be Press at Conventions

Slowly, we have been making the transition from convention attendee to convention observer.  Still, there is a lot of room for improvement in this field.  Every time I leave a con I think of a thousand things I could have done better as a reporter.

Here are a few:

  • Paying more attention to Cosplayers. This is my biggest weakness as media at cons.  I see these people work so hard and yet I don’t take nearly enough pictures of Cosplayers.  I think it goes to my natural shyness and the awkwardness of asking someone to take their picture.  I need to do a better job of that.  Also, I really need to start interviewing cosplayers.  Why did they pick that cosplay? What led them to cosplay? How did they make their costume?  I think it would enhance the blog to do this more.
  • Splitting up with Mrs. Nola Nerd Couple. OK, not that kind of splitting up.  It’s just that we often do the same things at cons.  We could double the amount of ground to cover if we split up.  We did this at Celebration, and I think it really showed in our followed up podcast since we had so much more to talk about.
  • Ask comic creators for short interviews.  This is really hard because they are there to make money. This is their livelihoo. Plus, when I do ask, I often feel imposter syndrome. I know more than I think I do, but I feel intimidated asking creators questions.
  • Attend more panels.  Panels can be hit or miss.  Panels with celebrities need to be moderated well. Fan questions sometimes venture into character/actor confusion. Still, they can give great insights into the craft.  Fan lead panels need to be well thought out and truly planned.  Getting up on a stage and talking about something is like being in a class with an unprepared teacher.  The planned out panels can be treasure mine of great information.
  • Interview independent vendors.  A lot of artists at shows are local artists selling their wares. Every con we go to we see one person who has such a unique idea that we end up spending lots of time talking to the artist…without our microphone.  Other vendors go to con to con.  They must have great convention stories that haven’t been broadcasted.

Running this blog is becoming a full-time job in the amount of hours it takes to work.  I often wake up at 5 am and write until 6, and then do the photo editing at night after work. Organizing my time was the first big move I had to make to learn how to do this blog as a news source.  Now, it’s time to work on gathering the information so I can write more interesting blogs about conventions.

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